Simple Cisco Text File Changes

As we are busy diving into the world of programming and automation, I’d like to remind everyone of a way to make simple config changes to a Cisco switch or router using a text file. This might not be a breakthrough, but it helps when making changes to switches or routers when those changes can possibly disconnect you from the device. Imagine working on a re-IP of a switch or even a point to point link. You have your notepad ready to go. There is a new IP and default route and all you have to do is copy/paste. You paste in the IP and lose connection. Your default route change never actually pasted because you lost connection right after the IP change. You can no longer connect to the device; panic ensues. What might be a better way to make this change and avoid the “Uh oh!” moment? Continue reading Simple Cisco Text File Changes

Network Devices: Easy Config Tips

If you work in networking, you probably take care of the switches and routers in your environment or have some input on what happens with them. Switches are the doorway to the network. Even if you have a wireless device, the access point you connect to is probably connected to a switch. This is where your PCs, TVs, appliances and many other wired devices connect. Routers can manage connections in and out of your environment along with a plethora of other services. Everyone should have a template or standard config they use on any network device. With today’s tools and services like Prime Infrastructure or DNA Center, you can spread that configuration around or deploy it to new sites; however, you still need a config to apply. Different scenarios and environments call for different configuration, but there are always those sets of commands you can use everywhere. The goal of this writing is to share a few commands that are helpful and I typically apply. Most of these are commands you spot all over certification studies and others I’ve seen other engineers use.
Yes, you probably memorized every single command from the CCNA and even the CCNP…but did you apply them all on every single port? Sometimes, unless there is a need you might not have to. I call it, situational configuration. Apply what you need and what will keep the environment secure. The important piece is to be consistent. On switches, VLANs might be different for each interface, but why would some of your switches have “enable password” and others have “enable secret”? Continue reading Network Devices: Easy Config Tips